Tag Archives: ES6

Setup Travis CI & SauceLabs for Protractor

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Add end to end testing to your continuous integration

You already know those technologies ? Jump directly to how to setup Travis CI & SauceLabs for Protractor.

Reminders

What are Travis CI, SauceLabs & Protractor ?

Protractor is an end-to-end test framework for AngularJS applications. It can also test any non-angular applications since it’s a wrapper around WebDriverJs (which controls the Selenium Server) and Jasmine (which brings the testing framework).

seleniumVia Selenium, it will send commands to web browsers (like “click here” then “check if this is displayed”, “populate that field”, “submit the form” then “check if we are logged in” …).

SauceLabs is a cross-browser automation tool built on top of Selenium WebDriver. It lets you run your end-to-end tests on multiple browsers and operating systems, in the cloud (you can run tests in multiple vms in parallel). It integrates very well in CI tools such as Travis CI.

Travis CI is an open-source hosted, distributed continuous integration service used to build and test projects hosted at GitHub. You configure it with a simple .travis.yml file where you specify your CI workflow (you can launch test scripts as well as deploy scripts).

It will try to build your project and run your tests on each push (on any branches, including pull-requests). It supports many languages and you’ll see a lot of open-source projects using it.

If you want to know more – some resources:

Why use SauceLabs with Travis CI ?

By default, Travis CI doesn’t provide extended features for e2e testing. You’ll see that on SauceLabs, you can use your Protractor/Selenium tests “as is” (just add a little config) and get lots of interesting informations such as extended logs, screencast (video playback) …

Setup Travis CI & SauceLabs for Protractor

This part takes for granted that you already know how to run protractor tests in local.

Pre-requisites

Create a SauceLabs account

Download Travis cli

Follow these instructions to download the Travis Command Line Interface.

Setup SauceLabs credentials

Go to your SauceLabs account and retrieve your ACCESS KEY. Then, at the root of your project:

travis login

#the following will encrypt and add the tokens to your .travis.yml

travis encrypt SAUCE_USERNAME=[your-SauceLabs-login] --add
travis encrypt SAUCE_ACCESS_KEY=[your-SauceLabs-AccessKey] --add

Enable Sauce Connect addon for Travis CI

Travis CI integration with SauceLabs automatically sets up a tunnel required to get started testing with. To do that we need to enable the Sauce Connect addon for Travis CI.

To enable Sauce Connect for Travis CI, add the following to your .travis.yml file:

addons:
  sauce_connect: true

That way, the e2e tests launched on your Travis CI will be executed on SauceLabs’s Selenium server which in return will have access to the test server you’ll be running from your Travis CI – all this, via Sauce Connect’s encrypted tunnel.

running-tests-on-sauce-connect

Upgrade your protractor config

Add the following to your protractor config file. This is a basic config. It won’t affect your local tests, it will only activate when running on Travis CI:

if (process.env.TRAVIS) {
  config.sauceUser = process.env.SAUCE_USERNAME;
  config.sauceKey = process.env.SAUCE_ACCESS_KEY;
  config.capabilities = {
    'browserName': 'chrome',
    'tunnel-identifier': process.env.TRAVIS_JOB_NUMBER,
    'build': process.env.TRAVIS_BUILD_NUMBER
  };
}

Feel free to customize it (if you don’t work with protractor but only Selenium WebDriver, it’s about the same).

Don’t forget to add the task running protractor to the tests to be run by Travis CI on the .travis.yml file, in the script section.

Tips

Keep in mind you’ll need a server to run your e2e tests against (this is not unit testing), so you will have to launch an instance of this server in the before_script part of the .travis.yml file.

Since you are doing tests, this server might have to be in “test” mode (providing mock results on API endpoints for example).

Even if your app is full front-end and doesn’t rely on a backend you built, you will have to provide a server to run your e2e tests on (this is my case on topheman/vanilla-es6-jspm).

Good thing to know: when you develop in ES6 using runtime transpiling (like babel-runtime), a lot of different scripts are loaded (and evaled browser-side), which can raise timeouts SauceLabs-side (that you didn’t have on your local computer when running your e2e tests).

To avoid that, run your e2e tests against a bundled version of your website (all scripts/assets bundled/concateneted in one or a few files). This will relieve the traffic on the sauce tunnel and the VM, SauceLabs-side (that may not be as powerfull as your computer).

Resources

I set up Travis CI with SauceLabs for Protractor on my latest project: topheman/vanilla-es6-jspm, to have my e2e test being a part of my continuous integration workflow.

Take a look at the commit where I added the feature, it could give you some ideas of implementation …

Tophe

Edit: Using React ? Here is one of my latest projects topheman/react-es6-redux where I also setup SauceLabs (amongst other things like unit-tests, code coverage on es6+ …)

Feedbacks on my Isomorphic app using React and ES6

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UPDATE: This project has been upgraded to React v0.14read the blog post about the upgrade.

This post is about a three steps project I initiated a few weeks ago. I completed the previous step about two weeks ago, so feel free to read my blog post about the front-end part : “Playing with ES6 (and React)”.

Before going further, a quote from stackoverflow (this is the most concise I found) :

Isomorphic web sites can be run on both the server and in the browser. They grant code reuse, seo, and page load speed boosts while still having an interface written in JS. node.js is most often used for the server javascript-engine.

Initial Goal

My challenge was to make an isomorphic app, using React and ES6 :

  • ES6 : I’ve been hearing about it for a while on meetups, articles I read, videos I watched – just like I knew it already – had to throw some real lines of codes 😉
  • React : Same as above (moreover, I’ve been doing a lot of Angular the past two years and hearing more and more about React lately, so I had to try it for real)
  • Isomorphic app : If I were about to use React in a project, it seems to be the perfect opportunity to try to implement it

Project Steps

I split the project into three parts :

  • topheman-apis-proxy : The backend part (and a project on its own as well, since it’s extensible and configurable)
  • topheman/react-es6 : The frontend part where I developed the app in ES6, using React, with the last step in mind – I only used isomorphic libraries
  • topheman/react-es6-isomorphic : The expressJS server in the middle, that handles server-side rendering. I retrieved the frontend part from the previous step. At this point, any missing feature in the client was first developed on the frontend project repo then merged back to this one, to make sure that each project stays focused on its scope (one on frontend, the other on server-side rendering).

Try the app (there is an about page that will help you understand the difference between the two projects). If you’re into React and server-side rendering, take a look at my feedbacks

Give it a try ! Continue reading

Playing with ES6 (and React)

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UPDATES:

For the last two years, I’ve heard a lot about ES6 : on blog posts, videos, attending at meetups … It was like I knew it already but never really used it … I felt that it was time to get my hands dirty and get on board with this new version of JavaScript – which will be the one we’ll be using in the next years – as some of you will point out : “are already using …”.

As I also wanted to try React (same : heard a lot about it just as if I knew it, but never really wrote any line of code with it). My POC’s endgoal is to do an isomorphic app (server-side rendering, same code running on client and server), for the moment, I finished the client-side part.

Checkout the demo

Using Webpack

Webpack takes your modules (and all their dependencies) then creates a bundle out of them. Since you can run multiple transformers, it will be able to handle ES6 modules, jsx, sass/scssMore infos on Webpack.

Setting up .js and .jsx transpiling (turning ES6 to ES5) using Babel was the easy part. But I also wanted sass stylesheets, with sourceMaps support and not having to require them via js (but in a regular link tag). This part of the Webpack documentation lacks informations (I don’t even know if I did it right, though, it works – as well in dev as in build prod …).

Coding in ES6

At first, it feels like you’re coding in a whole new language (at least, not in JavaScript) 😉 . Using import, export, class, extends … But after all, this is only syntactic sugar, which you would have added by yourself with your own tools or a third party library. Now it’s built-in (this may let JavaScript more accessible to Java/C like devs 😉 ).

Using React

I’ve been using Angular for a long time now. We all know its drawbacks … Some devs are even switching to React for its performances. This is why I was interested in the library (that and the server-side rendering part).

One of the good things in React is it forces you to think “Component” (not the first library to do that – a lot of them are converging towards this concept). You need to know where you’ll keep your state, which part of your app will be mutable, which one will be immutable.

Conclusion

I achieved my goal as I finished this part of my project : coding a POC in ES6, using React. You can see more of the steps on the github repository of topheman/react-es6. The next step will be to use this project to make some server-side rendering (since I used npm packages available for front and back such as superagent, I should be able to take the project “as is”).

You should try ES6, it’s fun to code with and we are seeing it more and more in libraries source code – why not in yours ?

Tophe

PS : The backend of topheman/react-es6 is based on topheman-apis-proxy, a project I made to handle my public APIs. Check it out on github if you’re interested in. I hosted it on heroku, so the VM takes about 3s to warm up when it’s asleep …